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Tuesday 27 September 2016 | Article of the day and last 5 Articles

      
      
  MRE News - 21/09/2016 Our opposition to the Hinkley Point project is well documented and undiminished. However we were interested to read an intelligent article that at least goes some way to explaining an ...
    MRE News Bulletin - 16/09/2016 The relative flood of news from the USA shows no sign of abating and as can be expected in such a deeply innovative country, when things get moving, they get moving - ...
    News from MRE - 13th September 2016 Hello, As a general rule, we have been reporting English language news to the French-speaking market. To-day we are doing the reverse - reporing on events in France ...
Power lines to connect up a huge proposed wind farm off the east coast of England have been approved by the Government, in a decision condemned as "disastrous" by the Tory-led local council. The turbines of the Triton ...
A new offshore wind turbine from Siemens is set to lower the cost of wind power generated on the high seas. Siemens believes it is well on the way to reaching its goal of producing offshore wind energy at a total cost ...
  MRE News - 21/09/2016 Our opposition to the Hinkley Point project is well documented and undiminished. However we were interested to read an intelligent article that at least goes some way to explaining an otherwise inexplicable folly. The conclusion however rests on an assumption that we cannot share....
    MRE News Bulletin - 16/09/2016 The relative flood of news from the USA shows no sign of abating and as can be expected in such a deeply innovative country, when things get moving, they get moving - faster and faster. The tussle for world leadership in offshore wind turbines has only just started. Our guess remains that GE agreed to buy the Alstom offshore wind division with its 6Mw Haliade turbine not because of the French (or even European) market, but because of the opportunity that it was forecasting in the USA. Some indications of the enormous scope this may represent is now emerging.....
    News from MRE - 13th September 2016 Hello, As a general rule, we have been reporting English language news to the French-speaking market. To-day we are doing the reverse - reporing on events in France for our english-speaking readers. France is a weird and wonderful country. Blessed with an inventive and hard-working population, it handicaps itself fatally by creating a bureaucratic nightmare that not even the French themselves can decipher. All thinking French know that it cannot work, but the country cannot pluck up the courage to find its own Maggie Thatcher to strike down the Stalinist CGT union; fire 25% of state employees and thus reduce the level of government spending from its current 56% to something nearer 45%. Getting rid of the regions, departments,and both forms of Prefects would probably also be helpful. There are faint signs that the fractious right and cetre-right parties are reaching that conclusion. Since the left is currently unelectable - shades of the UK there - now is a good time to try! All this spills over into marine renewables, with which we include all forms of offshore wind. There follows a mildly sarcastic summary of the scene as we see it... sector by sector...
Power lines to connect up a huge proposed wind farm off the east coast of England have been approved by the Government, in a decision condemned as "disastrous" by the Tory-led local council. The turbines of the Triton Knoll offshore wind farm were granted planning permission in 2013, but the controversial cabling work was treated a separate application after delays in National Grid finalising the best place for them to connect to the electricity network. Greg Clark, the business and energy secretary, on Tuesday granted planning permission for the connection, which will see a 35-mile stretch of cabling buried underground through Lincolnshire. Developers Innogy, the renewables subsidiary of RWE, and Statkraft said they now planned to seek subsidies to support the construction of Triton Knoll in an upcoming Government auction due to be held early next year. The project is expected to involve up to 200 turbines with a capacity of up to 900 megawatts (MW), and will involve total investment of about £3bn over its lifetime, Innogy said, declining to disclose the cost of the actual construction work.
A new offshore wind turbine from Siemens is set to lower the cost of wind power generated on the high seas. Siemens believes it is well on the way to reaching its goal of producing offshore wind energy at a total cost of less than ten euro cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh) by 2020. In fact, it expects that generation costs for offshore wind power plants will decline to less than eight cents per kWh by 2025. Siemens and other companies in the wind energy business agreed on this target at the beginning of June 2016. Siemens' new wind turbine can generate eight megawatts (MW) of electrical power – previous systems were capable of no more than seven MW. The new turbine has a rotor diameter of 154 meters, which is the same as its predecessor model, but it can generate up to ten percent more energy per year, depending on its location. That is enough to supply 8,000 households with electricity. Considering these figures, under appropriate conditions, a wind farm could therefore supply the same amount of energy with nine instead of ten turbines, which naturally lowers associated investment and operating costs per watt of generated power. The key to the increased output lies in stronger permanent magnets in the generator. A prototype of the new wind turbine, the SWT-8.0-154, will be installed at a test site in Østerild, Denmark, in early 2017. Type certification is planned at the beginning of 2018. Stronger Magnets Induce more Power Direct drive wind turbines do not need a gearbox to increase their speed from the rotors to a higher speed suitable for the generator. Instead, a synchronous generator with permanent magnets converts the movement of the rotor directly into electrical energy. Without a heavy gearbox, the system is lighter and more compact. Since it has fewer components, it also requires less maintenance. Furthermore, directly driven wind turbines achieve good efficiency rates even at low wind speeds, because no power outlays are needed to operate electromagnets in the generator. To further boost generator output, the magnetic strength of the permanent magnets was increased so that more current is induced. Siemens achieved this by changing the magnets' composition in cooperation with the manufacturer. To ensure that they can operate at greater power, design changes were also made to the converters that adjust the voltage and frequency of the generated power before it is fed into the electrical grid. Siemens manufactures the converters for its wind turbines itself. They have a modular design so they can be adapted to a variety of turbine power levels. It was therefore a simple matter to extend them to the generator's output of eight megawatts. All the other components of the new system – particularly the rotor blades and power transformer – remain the same. From long-term observations of the seven-megawatt turbines, engineers concluded that the mechanical elements, such as the bearings, will remain stable when operating with the higher torques of the eight-megawatt variant. Siemens can therefore preserve the tried and tested technology and the reliability of its predecessor model to take full advantage of its well-established logistics processes and supply chains. That's the key to the rapid market launch of the eight-megawatt wind turbine. Source: Siemens
Obama administration proposes massive 7200TWh/year offshore wind energy program

    MRE News Bulletin - 16/09/2016 The relative flood of news from the USA shows no sign of abating and as can be expected in such a deeply innovative country, when things get moving, they get moving - faster and faster. The tussle for world leadership in offshore wind turbines has ...

Orkneys Churchill Barriers tidal project

The Churchill Barriers in Orkney, UK link a series of small islands on the east side of Scapa Flow and they were built during World War II to form a protective barrier against submarine intrusion after the sinking of the battleship Royal Oak by a German submarine in 1939. The barriers have changed ...

Gibraltar's landmark wave power station opens for business

Daily News N°16052 - mre.solutions - 27th May 2016 MRN has alwaus believed that sooner or later someone would find an economic, viable solution to the problem of capturing wave energy. We are also known supporters of the belief that many of the opportunities will lie outside the rich developed ...

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